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DuPage County Social Studies Conference

Metea Valley High School
March 3, 2023
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2023 DCSSC

Northern Illinois Largest Social Studies Conference
March 3, 2023
07:00 am

This year's conference will include sessions on pedagogy, such as news literacy, formative assessment, and digital citizenship, in addition to the content topics in History, Geography, Civics, Economics, Sociology, and Psychology.

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About DCSSC

What is the DCSSC?

For over 30 years, the DuPage County Social Studies Conference has been offering Northern Illinois social studies teachers an annual conference on county-wide institute day.

 

The conference brings together university professors, experts in the field, and community activists to present relevant content and methodology that teachers can apply to their own classrooms.

The Conference

Session Topics & Schedule

Proud to offer diverse topics in Social Studies Education and Pedagogy.

Session I: 8:00-8:55 AM - Speaker Session

8:00 am-8:55 am

9-12

A Half Century of Shame: America’s Rising Incarceration Rate [virtual]

Mr. Ben Austen and Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

In 1973, the United States imprisoned 200,000 people. Today, that number is 1.2 million. Additionally, America locks up a quarter of all the incarcerated people in the world. The session will highlight the presenters’ recent work, both separately and together, on telling histories of mass imprisonment in America to lead a conversation about how to teach, write about, and also change this aberration that has become such the norm in this country.  Mr. Austen and Dr. Muhammad will be presenting virtually to an in-person audience.

U.S. History

Sociology

8:00 am-8:55 am

Bringing Inscriptions into the Classroom

Dr. Lee L. Brice

An important aspect of teaching history is getting students to grapple with how we know what we think we know about the past. Analyzing inscriptions [monuments, headstones, engravings, etc.] in class can stimulate student interest and enhance their grasp of the material. This presentation explores why inscriptions matter as sources and how historians use them. It  will include exercises for exploring inscriptions and provide a detailed “field” assignment where students can investigate inscriptions.  This assignment does not require any prior historical knowledge on the part of students or field trips.   It consistently pays dividends by exploring the commonalities of the human experience and the different ways cultures express themselves through social values.

6-12

Civics/Gov

8:00 am-8:55 am

Race and the City: Redlining, Public Housing and the New Deal

Dr. Peter Cole

For generations, people in states outside the former Confederacy have condemned Southern states for racism and segregation. While those charges are accurate, they also mask the reality that racial segregation, especially in housing and neighborhoods, has long been a national phenomenon. In the 20th century, the Great Migration resulted in six million African American Southerners moving to cities in other regions who generally ended up in predominantly Black neighborhoods. This presentation will explore the historical roots of contemporary racial segregation: the widespread use of restrictive covenants, federal policies during and after the New Deal, redlining in the banking sector, the racial violence perpetrated by some white people, and other elements that created the segregation that continues to define many American metropolitan areas.

6-12

U.S. History

8:00 am-8:55 am

Teaching Inclusive American History: Implementing the New Illinois History Course Mandates

Ms. Mary Ellen Daneels

This session provides an overview of ISBE’s revised social science standards including, but not limited to new course mandates such as LGBTQ History, the Teaching Equitable Asian American Community History, and the contributions of different faith traditions to the history of Illinois and the United States. Resources and strategies will be shared to enhance current practice to address the design challenge of teaching "America’s Plural Yet Shared Story" per the Educating for American Democracy Roadmap.

U.S. History

9-12

8:00 am-8:55 am

Lessons in Leadership: First Division- WWII

Ms. Jackie Gillaspie

This session will provide unique stories of leadership and service connected to D-Day, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Bulge through the lens of three 1st Division soldiers whose leadership dramatically impacted the course of these battles and shaped their legacy. Featured will be 1LT Jimmie Monteith’s Medal of Honor action on Omaha Beach, LTC Derrill Daniel’s development of urban warfare tactics during the Battle of Aachen, and CPT Joe Dawson’s emphasis on the importance of addressing combat fatigue during urban warfare operations near Aachen.

U.S. History

6-12

8:00 am-8:55 am

Religious Pluralism: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

Mr. Brian Hoffert

This presentation will focus on a comparison of Eastern and Western approaches to religious pluralism. In particular, the Western tendency to emphasize peaceful coexistence with little real interaction or mixing of ideas will be contrasted with Eastern syncretism, where various religions exist in a symbiotic relationship that encourages active participation in multiple traditions.

World History

Geography

9-12

8:00 am-8:55 am

Birth Order: Understanding Your Family Constellation

Dr. Michael Maniacci

Birth Order Theory is a very useful concept for understanding many of the choices people make.  This workshop will detail how one’s place in one’s family leads to personality traits and characteristics and how those traits are used for self improvement.  

9-12

Psychology

8:00 am-8:55 am

American Support for Hungary in 1849 and Ukraine Today: A Comparative Perspective

Dr. Tim Roberts

The Hungarian independence movement was strangely popular in the United States despite Americans knowing virtually nothing of Hungarian culture.  Why did Americans champion the Hungarian cause and why does it matter? The answer sheds light on the first time the United States debated intervening in Europe and provides perspective on why Americans have rallied around  modern Ukraine. This presentation will illuminate connections between both events, focusing on the two national leaders, the role of Russia, and Americans’ rationale for support.

World History

9-12

8:00 am-8:55 am

Fundamental Rights at the Supreme Court

Dr. Steve Schwinn 

The Supreme Court’s last term took a sharp turn in how it evaluates and protects fundamental Constitutional rights. For the first time in American history, the Court overturned a fifty-year-old fundamental right, dramatically expanded the Second Amendment right to bear arms, and changed the way the Religion Clauses operate. This presentation will explore the Court’s new methodology behind these revolutionary rulings and how it will likely impact issues related to race, sexual orientation, free speech, the right to vote and more.  

Civics/Gov

6-12

Session II: 9:10-10:05 AM - Speaker Session

9:10 am-10:05 am

Civic Online Reasoning: Sorting Fact from Fiction on the Internet

Dr. Joel Breakstone

The Stanford History Education Group’s Civic Online Reasoning curriculum, based on research with professional fact checkers and tested in classrooms across the country, teaches students to effectively evaluate online content. During this interactive workshop, participants will consider the research behind the curriculum, review curricular materials, and discuss how these resources can be integrated into their own classrooms. 

Civics/Gov

Pedagogy

6-12

​9:10 am-10:05 am

Telling a More Complete Story: Incorporating Authentic Native American Resources

Ms. Shana Bushyhead Condill

This presentation will give attendees an opportunity to expand their knowledge of misrepresentations and stereotypes in current curriculum about Native people. This session will provide potential resources to incorporate into curricula and why multiple lenses make narratives more authentic and interesting.

U.S. History

6-12

​9:10 am-10:05 am

Resumes & Interviews: Tips for Pre-Service & Early Career Teachers

Mr. Adam Dyche & Mr. Jason Jaffe

Competition for social studies openings is fierce. With hundreds of applicants, how do you stand out in the crowd? Area Department Chairs will walk through job postings, cover letters and resumes, job fairs and networking, and interviews. This session is for current or recent student teachers, or teachers early in their careers. In addition to providing time for answering questions, this session will provide tips and strategies for landing a position in the district of your dreams.

Pedagogy

​9:10 am-10:05 am

Russia Update: Emphasis on the War in Ukraine

Dr. Richard Farkas

As the war in Ukraine continues there can be little doubt that the consequences for the Russian society and regime are profound.  The Ukrainian society and its capacity to survive and reconstitute itself are also in doubt. The conflict’s impact on the global system – commercial, diplomatic, and alliance systems will dramatically reshape the world.  

World History

9-12

​9:10 am-10:05 am

Rethinking Procrastination: How Intentional Delay Can Sometimes Lead to Better Outcomes

Dr. Colin Harbke

Delaying work on tasks in order to engage in other, more pleasant activities is a widespread practice that can be frustrating for teachers and parents. Though historically viewed as a negative practice that leads to poorer performance, more recent research suggests that procrastination can sometimes serve a functional role and even lead to better outcomes and experiences. The important roles of task motivation, confidence, and how deadlines affect the likelihood of procrastination will be discussed.

Psychology

9-12

​9:10 am-10:05 am

Intending to Have Almighty God Praised: The Experience of Religion in the Age of Reformation

Dr. Jennifer McNabb

The sixteenth-century religious reformations had an explosive impact on early modern institutions and ideologies which led to debating Christian theology and hierarchy, redefining the geo-political map of Europe, and renegotiating the relationship between church and state. Reformation was an intensely personal experience, as people saw their churches stripped of traditional ornaments of worship, witnessed religious guilds disbanded, heard the song and the word of liturgies altered, and faced new ideas about charity. This presentation examines how religious change affected the rhythms and rituals of daily life for those living in both Protestant and Catholic territories. 

World History

6-12

​9:10 am-10:05 am

The Crossroads of Buddhism and SEL: Where the Twain Shall Meet

Mr. Bob Miller

The great diversity and rich complexity of Buddhist thought poses a challenge to the instructor who seeks to introduce their students to Buddhism. This talk, by a practicing Buddhist, will offer alternatives to traditional text-based instruction to foster skills such as attention and empathy, which are applicable to a student's whole education and not just a single unit of Buddhism. Specific lesson ideas include creative role-playing exercises in which students imagine themselves as Himalayan villagers to better understand how religion functions as a “cultural system” and basic contemplative exercises that help students foster attention, nurture conscious awareness, and critically appraise their thoughts and emotions. 

World History

Geography

​9:10 am-10:05 am

World War II: Experiences and Perspectives from Asia

Dr. Febe Pamonag

More than seventy years after its conclusion, World War II remains controversial in Asia. This presentation will examine how people in East Asia, particularly in China, Korea, and Japan experienced and remember World War II. Various media, including a documentary film, historical fiction, and letters, will be analyzed for what they can tell us about the experiences, memories, and contested legacies of this war. This session provides an opportunity for teachers to discuss ways to foster critical thinking skills and how to apply an analytic framework that will engender a fuller and nuanced picture of Asian peoples’ experiences and perspectives of World War II.

U.S. History

6-12

​9:10 am-10:05 am

Bridging the Political Divide: How Economic Thinking Can Help Lead America Out of the Current Climate of Hyper-Partisanship [virtual]

Dr. Charles Wheelan

This session will explain how broken incentives have led to the current era of political gridlock, division, and dysfunction. It will then highlight non-partisan solutions that foster a more representative and functional government, highlighting Unite America’s efforts to bring about ranked-choice voting in Alaska in the last election.  Dr. Wheelan will be presenting virtually to an in-person audience.

Economics

Civics/Gov

9-12

Session III: 10:20-11:15 AM - Speaker Session

10:20 am-11:15 am

Living for the City: The Past and Present of New Urbanism

Dr. Peter Cole

America is a predominantly suburban nation with more than 80% of Americans living in metropolitan areas and more than two-thirds of those in suburbs. There are many reasons for the consequential shifts in American life—from rural to urban to suburban—but it could not have happened without the automobile. Auto-dependency and suburbanization have enormous consequences. New Urbanism is an approach to development, created by planners, architects, and others, who advocate for a return to more traditional methods of city and town building. This presentation will explore New Urbanism using the history of 20th century America.

Geography

6-12

10:20 am-11:15 am

Walking the Tightrope of Self-Defense: Re-evaluating the divide between the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power

Dr. Cheryl Dong

While the popular imagination often juxtaposes Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X as polar opposites of each other, the actual history of these two men and the movements they represented remain entangled and complex.  This presentation will re-evaluate the divide between the non-violent Civil Rights Movement of the South and the urban Black Power Movement and challenge the idea that these movements came from divergent impulses.  This session will trace the common origins of Civil Rights and Black Power and the shared leadership between them.

U.S. History

6-12

10:20 am-11:15 am

What’s Wrong with America?: A Global Perspective 

 Dr. Richard Farkas

Americans are disinclined to see themselves as others see them, which limits what the U.S. can accomplish in international affairs. This session will explore American “exceptionalism” and the suggestion that only Americans have a keen insight into global problems and solutions.  The session will also explore how hyper-partisanship has gripped the domestic political landscape in America.  

World History

Civics/Gov

U.S. History

9-12

10:20 am-11:15 am

The Rise of Right-Wing Populism in Europe and North America

Dr. David Faris

Since Brexit in Europe and the election of President Donald Trump in the United States, increased attention has been paid to the rise of parties and figures on the political right. Many of these organizations work together and are also united by a growing dissatisfaction with, and waning commitment to, electoral democracy itself. This presentation will examine what has caused these parties to gain popularity and take power in some countries.

World History

Civics/Gov

9-12

10:20 am-11:15 am

Thinking Intensive Reading

Ms. Stefanie Geeve & Ms. Nessa Slowinski

This session will look at ways to help students increase their reading comprehension within the social studies classroom through a variety of strategies.  Students’ reading stamina has shifted.  How can teachers use reading targets, annotation moves, and aligned formative experiences to engage students in thinking-intensive reading of texts, visuals, podcasts, and documentaries?  Participants will examine ways to assess reading standards and provide a variety of strategies that support critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, and communication.  

Pedagogy

10:20 am-11:15 am

The Do’s and Don’ts in Teaching about Asian Americans

Ms. Esther Hurh

To ensure the authentic and respectful teaching of the Asian American experience, this session will present key pedagogical principles for teachers to apply to their planning and implementation of the TEAACH Act. This session will include an overview of implementation tools, including teacher created Asian American Education Resource (AAER) database, to assist teachers in their efforts to include the Asian American experience in their lessons.

U.S. History

6-12

10:20 am-11:15 am

The Status of the Illinois SAFE-T Act and What Your Students Should Know About It

Mr. Tom Murray & Judge Brian McKillip

After much political wrangling, amendments, and compromise, this presentation will clarify the actual status of the controversial Illinois SAFE-T Act.  This legislation includes changes to policing, pre-trial process, sentencing, as well as the cash bail situation and the limits of judicial discretion. This session will provide the most current update on the status of the act.

Civics/Gov

Sociology

10:20 am-11:15 am

Understanding the 2022 Protests in Iran [virtual]

Dr. Wendy Pearlman

On September 16, 2022, Iran’s Guidance Patrol arrested 22-year-old Mahsa (Jina) Amini for wearing the mandatory headscarf improperly. Her death in custody sparked protests that spread to dozens of cities, as well as other forms of unprecedented civil disobedience. This session will examine the nature of the Iranian political system, the recent history of protest movements in Iran, and prospects for political change in the Islamic Republic. Dr. Pearlman will be presenting virtually to an in-person audience.

World History

10:20 am-11:15 am

What Exclusion Looked Like in DuPage: Sundown Towns, Restrictive Covenants, & Segregated Spaces

Dr. Andrea Field

This session will explore the devices and tools used locally such as restrictive covenants, sundown town practices and homeowner preferences which prevented people of color and religious minorities from accessing area housing.  This session will highlight the influences from corporations, churches and colleges in DuPage county that influenced suburban housing.

Geography

Sociology

Civics/Gov

10:20 am-11:15 am

Inflation: Causes, Consequences & Historical Perspective 

Ms. Leslie McGranahan

This presentation will focus on recent patterns in inflation, how it is measured, and how current conditions differ from the past.  It will also discuss why inflation is problematic and the actions taken by the Federal Reserve to address inflation.

9-12

Session IV: 12:05-1:00 PM - Speaker Session

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

How to Read Like an Historian

Dr. Joel Breakstone

Join Stanford History Education Group’s Joel Breakstone for an introduction to the Reading Like a Historian curriculum. During this interactive workshop, participants will  learn about the research upon which the curriculum is based, explore the curriculum’s design principles, and complete a model lesson.

Pedagogy

U.S. History

6-12

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

Why Trauma-Informed Practices Must be Anti-Racist

Dr. Sophia Duffy

Americans are more politically polarized at both the elite and population levels than at any time since the Civil War. Toxic polarization makes democratic governance difficult, if not impossible, leading to divided, dysfunctional institutions, and driving distrust of decision makers and one another. This session will trace the trajectory of political polarization in the U.S., examine its underlying causes, discuss its implications for social studies education, and conclude with steps we can take as citizens and teachers to ameliorate it.

Psychology

Pedagogy

6-12

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

After the Vote: The State and Federal Policy Landscape Following the Midterm Elections

Dr. Shawn Healy

In the aftermath of the 2022 Midterm Elections, changes to party control of legislative chambers, victories by political newcomers, and pressing public issues will determine the contemporary state and federal policy. This presentation will provide understanding of key political leaders at the state and federal levels, their respective policy priorities, and related prospects for success. 

Civics/Gov

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

Jane Addams and Hull House

Dr. Ann Durkin Keating

Addams and Ellen Gates Starr sought to mitigate the problems of industrial workers by founding the Hull-House settlement in 1889 in an immigrant district of Chicago’s Near West Side. Their efforts will be compared to those of industrialist George Pullman, planner Daniel Burnham, and labor activist Albert Parsons. 

U.S. History

6-12

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

The Next Four Years: How Will J.B. Pritzker’s Reelection Impact the State’s Finances and Economy on the Whole?

Mr. Ralph Martire

During Governor Pritzker’s first four years in office, Illinois’ bond rating increased which signaled a strengthening of the state's financial position.  However, Illinois has also seen some large and well known companies announce they are leaving the state.  This session will explore the state’s current financial health and what the future might hold.

Economics

Civics/Gov

9-12

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

Filipino Experiences and Perspectives on U.S. Colonialism in the Philippines

Dr. Febe Pamonag

Until recently, most scholars have studied U.S. colonialism in the Philippines mainly from an American perspective. This session will offer ideas to develop inclusive curricula that considers experiences and perspectives from individuals who – due to their colonial status, class, race, gender, and health conditions, among other factors – were, and still are, most vulnerable to the effects of public health interventions in colonial and modern contexts.

World History

U.S. History

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

Turkey: History, Politics and the Challenge of Democracy [virtual]

Dr. Wendy Pearlman

This session will provide an introduction to political issues, events, and processes in Turkey from its founding of a modern nation state with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.  The presentation will discuss issues such as the Atatürk legacy, tensions between secular and religious identities, the relationship between the state and ethnic minorities, and the country’s evolving relations in the Middle East region. It will give particular attention to the challenge of democracy, increasing authoritarian tendencies under President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and the ongoing struggle for democratic rights and accountability. Dr. Pearlman will be presenting virtually to an in-person audience.

World History

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

Reading Maps that Lie

Dr. RJ Rowley

Maps are essential instruments of communication.  However, maps’ construction and interpretation can lead to a number of contrasting messages for the reader or even a false message about a particular topic.  This presentation will illustrate the ways maps lie, how to teach students to identify those lies, and what can be done to more accurately interpret what maps have to say.  Examples will come from a variety of topics, including cultural, demographic, topographic, political, and general use maps that show both qualitative and quantitative information.

Geography

6-12

12:05 pm-1:00 pm

Taking the World by Storm: Hellenistic Queens and Princesses

Dr. Georgia Tsouvala

After the death of Alexander the Great, in the cosmopolis of the Hellenistic world (323-31 BCE), royal women continued to play prominent public roles, but the extent of their power varied dramatically based on the dynasty, generation, geography, and individuality. Utilizing multiple sources to explore the title “queen”, this session will focus on case studies of royal women in the Hellenistic period.   

World History

6-12

Session Topics

Lunch & Learns

Voluntary opportunities to eat, learn, and grow.

Coming Soon: Lunch & Learn Options

Lunch & Learns
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Cost: $50 per attendee.

 

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Please complete one payment form for your school, and email or fax it back to the address below. Only one form is needed per school. Payment is due 30 days prior.

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